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Shaolin Ch'uan Fa
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
First, you need to break down what you really want. Everything you want or get comes with trade offs.
The lower you go, the ride will usually get firmer. You need to stiffen your suspension (eliminate the bounce), as you reduce your verticle travel. Once you decide on what you want, then you need to figure out how your going to get there.
What kind of money do you want to spend? Do you have a need or a desire to adjust the height of your vehicle? Do you want a car that handles as good as it looks or are you wanting "the lowered look with a comfy ride?"

So lets go with your options:

Money is not really an issue, you might consider air bags. The ride quality is good from what I understand and you have the option of "slamming" your car to the ground. At around $3000.00 + or -, it's an expensive option that has it's usefulness if you are into showing your car. A vehicle with air bags can have it's height easily adjusted, "on the fly" if you will, from switches mounted inside the vehicle. Air bags can be more easily damaged than other suspension options. It's best to talk to those that have them to understand the pros and cons of air bag systems.

Then there are Coilovers. Coilovers are a very good choice IMO because you can Adjust the height of your car, adjust the damping of the shocks (firmness) and have very good handling. Adjustments to Coilovers must take place outside the vehicle, often requiring that the weight be taken off the suspension and/or removing the wheels prior to adjustments being made.. Having these options makes Coilovers ideal for track as well as street use. At $1200.00 - $1400.00, they're also expensive.

If you want a lowered look with anywhere from stock to performance type handling, then there are Spring/Damper combinations by many different manufacturers that are available. The most common, just to give you an example would be 2 springs made by Eibach. Pro-kit springs and Sportline-kit springs. The pro springs have a 1" -1.5" drop and a moderate spring rate. Not a lot firmer than stock. The Sportline-kit springs have a 2" drop and a much firmer spring rate. Both of these spring kits would benefit from Eibach pro-dampers. The pro dampers are a performance shock made for use with lowering springs, in particular Eibach springs. (they can be used with any springs) With a moderate drop, say 1"-1.5", you might get away with your stock shocks saving you money and leaving your ride more like a stock ride. Keep in mind that with a higher spring rate, if you keep stock shocks, things may be bouncy. It all depends on your tolerance and again, what you're looking for. Anything lower than pro-springs, (like sportlines 2" drop) almost require pro dampers because the ride would be too rough and way too bouncy. Expect to pay around $230.00 + for springs and $400.00 + for dampers. There are package deals, so shop around.

***FYI - The LX platform has an independent rear suspension. There is no adjustment for camber. (front or rear) The lower you go, the more negative the camber becomes (wheels tilt in at the top) This can be corrected by installing bushings in the rear and/or new control arms in the front.

"Strut bar", "Strut brace" and "Strut tower brace" refer to the same kind of device, a bar mounted between the front strut towers. The purpose of this bar is to reduce the flex that these towers experience during hard cornering. Reducing the flex will keep the wheels in the desired position on the road, allowing the suspension to work as engineered without chassis flex changing camber and caster settings. This will help to improve traction on the turns, increasing turn-in response, and help to reduce understeer.
By solidifying and isolating the struts in their original configuration, it allows the suspension components (stock or modified) to retain their geometry and to function as designed. Typically, steering will seem quicker and more responsive, but in reality, it is the suspension doing its job properly. These devices typically cost around $300.00


Sway bars are a torsion spring that resists body roll motions. Anti-roll bars (sway bars) provide two main functions. The first function is the reduction of body lean (roll). The other function of anti-roll bars is to tune the handling balance of a car. Sway bars are one of the more noticable upgrades that can be made to a car. Expect to pay from $250.00 - $350.00 for a front and rear sway bar set.

Well that's it for starters. These are some of the basics. If you have questions, I'm sure that anyone on these forums or myself would be glad to help
 
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SilverBack
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STICKY!!!!!

Great info, answers alot of questions concisely.
 

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Shaolin Ch'uan Fa
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Discussion Starter #3

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CMOM FOR DEC 08
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Yup sure looks accurate to me... we have lowering springs on our DEMON can with about a 2" drop, no dampeners and ours does bounce; not bad though and Tee and I both love the feel and the bounce ~ LOL
 

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I am seeing lots of brands out there.
Any news on the following brands?:
DZ___________
KSport_________
Tenzo_________
D2________

Are they just cheap knock offs or can they give a good ride?
 

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Shaolin Ch'uan Fa
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18,841 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I am seeing lots of brands out there.
Any news on the following brands?:
DZ___________
KSport_________
Tenzo_________
D2________

Are they just cheap knock offs or can they give a good ride?
Your going to have to ask those that use them. I wouldn't recommend a product I know nothing about.
 

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Something that needs to be addressed is the fact that any alteration from stock is going to require the ability to significantly adjust caster and camber specs. The stock setup was already beyond its ability to do this (i.e. cradle adjusts were even tried!) and thus the “wander” problem was such a problem. (pull right anyone) Fully adjustable LCA’s (~$400/set) or centric LCA bolts are a must in order to give your Magnum a decent handling setup and passable tire wear.

Also matching your dampers to your new “lowered” setup is a must if you want predictable and competent handling. Stock dampers on a lowered setup will be working out of their effective range. This is far from ideal in the least. Lowering just for the sake of lowering is a “show” queen’s job and is HIGHLY NOT recommended! Real drivers need not apply.
 

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Fab HO
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Shaolin Ch'uan Fa
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Discussion Starter #15

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does rim size have anything to do with how low you can lower your vehicle? ...i have 22 inch rims and was looking to lower my car anywhere from 1-1.5 inches....i was just worried if i would have to do any type of modifications to the wheel well or so... maybe a stupid question to the seasoned veterans of lowering but ive never lowered one so im searching for help! lol..let me know
 

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Shaolin Ch'uan Fa
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18,841 Posts
Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
does rim size have anything to do with how low you can lower your vehicle? ...i have 22 inch rims and was looking to lower my car anywhere from 1-1.5 inches....i was just worried if i would have to do any type of modifications to the wheel well or so... maybe a stupid question to the seasoned veterans of lowering but ive never lowered one so im searching for help! lol..let me know

Technically, the smaller the wheel size, the lower you can potentially go.
However, in an attempt to keep overall diameters approximately the same as stock, tire side walls get taller as the wheels get smaller.

With a 22" wheel and 265/35/22 tires (most common size), as long as your wheel width (8.5" - 9.5") and offset (+15 - +18) are ok. the Eibach Sportline kit will drop you 1" - 1.5" without having to worry about body modifications.
 

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Why is it that all the lowering kits I'm finding, lower the back more than the front? Looking at the wheel gaps on my Magnum, the front needs to come down more than the rear.....advice??
 

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Praise the Lowered!
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Why is it that all the lowering kits I'm finding, lower the back more than the front? Looking at the wheel gaps on my Magnum, the front needs to come down more than the rear.....advice??
Do you have an example of a kit that does that? Any decent, well put together system won't do that. Eibach certainly will not do that, you'll get an even drop front and rear. If you have the Nivomat rear shocks, you'll need to ditch them, because they will prevent your rear from going as low as it could with any lowering kit. And with coilovers, it's all in how you set them up.
 

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Shaolin Ch'uan Fa
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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Why is it that all the lowering kits I'm finding, lower the back more than the front? Looking at the wheel gaps on my Magnum, the front needs to come down more than the rear.....advice??
These kits lower the cars evenly. It appears as though the rear is lower because the wheel wells in the front are taller to provide more clearance.

To accurately measure the drop front & rear, one must measure on a flat, level surface at the rocker panels. In front of the rear tires and behind the front tires. (see photo)

 
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